Day 2: Building a Wooden Surfboard with Tree to Sea

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Day 2 was another early start but the momentum from the day before just kept building.  The flow was similar to the first day and everyone eventually found their own groove and more or less kept pace with each other.  Since I was building the smallest board I made it through some of the checkpoints a bit quicker than those with 10 foot logs but the process and methodology is pretty much the same for all of Rich's designs so I could help others when I had a free hand.  Day 2 is also when the shortcuts Rich has implemented into the assembly process really pay off.

The modified Blundell Strip and Feather technique uses a square cut ¼ inch strip opposed to Rich's original Grain design which incorporates bead and cove rail strips that interlock around the radius of the frame.  It also introduces CA Glue (Cyanoacrylate Glue) and using it's near instant bonding attributes to assemble the rails in a fraction of the time it would take to glue each bead and cove strip individually and wait for it to dry.

Just be sure to “mind the gap” as Rich would say!

This method does require that the back side of the rails and outside edges are coated in an epoxy and sawdust mix.  This method actually creates a structural I-Beam of epoxy between the ¼ inch strips and adds strength all around the rail structure.  The majority of the rest of the day was spent prepping the rails for the deck, sanding and plaining, and ultimately trying to create as flat of a surface as possible.  The last step for Day 2 was to glue the top deck onto the frame and secure tail blocks if needed.  At this point it really starts to look like a surfboard!  We left the boards in the rocker tables over night to dry and anxiously waited for the next morning.

At this point, those making their own fins were instructed on using the excess deck and hull material to create fins that would be glassed on later.

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